Archive for Branding

When branding is more than a logo

In a time when brand guidelines seek to stifle creativity. When exclusion zones, minimum sizes, usage do’s and don’ts rule the roost. Where brand guardians fiercely protect their turf over the insurgent designer who dares to be creative by ranging the brand font right. Along comes the day when a brand proves you can be far bigger than your ‘brand identity’. Well done Sun.

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It’s all about the uniqueness… of your careers website

As the web changes and the social platforms influence the way it’s used, sometimes you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s becoming more uniform. Careers website design seemingly borders on template formula. Any ‘big idea’ from an employer brand is often left on the homepage. And web technique, or technology, can overshadow the messages you’re trying to promote.

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For SC Johnson, the site ‘lives and breathes’ the Responsible Careers employer brand. From the ‘environmental’ Tree Navigation to the revealing of the SCintilating facts. From the Point of View of the employees to the ‘personality’ of the animated infographic videos. For a company that makes ‘chemical’ products, it portrays the real human side of an FMCG business.

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That human side is also upfront on EAT careers. The video only site promotes the passion of the people who work there. Filmed without scripts. In their words. In their shops. No fancy production. Real, honest communication. In three words. Just like the brand itself.

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Then there’s a brand with an ‘image problem’. Whose stores are seen as jumble sales. But the reality is so different. That’s TK Maxx. Where managers have more autonomy than almost every other high street, fashion retailer. But who would think that? Not many which is where a single-minded website comes into play. Highlighting what happens in a day. Hearing from existing Managers about what it’s really like. Understanding the success of the business. Testing yourself to see if you could manage one. All ensuring that you change your mind about the TK Maxx ‘experience’ and see the reality.

EAT was shortlisted in Best use of Digital Media in Recruitment at the Digiawards last night. And in tonight’s shortlists at the CIPD Recruitment Marketing Awards, we have TK Maxx in Best Recruitment Website and the SC Johnson site is part of the the Best Employer Brand entry. All our fingers and toes are crossed.

We love Oreos

Ooooh Oreo, we do more than like your Facebook page. It’s the ‘Ow-to for social brand ‘marketing’. It’s On brand. It’s ‘Own content’. It’s Oh-so consistent. It can Only be Oreo. And it’s an Ongoing demonstration of ‘Ow to keep developing a social strategy. Especially for those who think that any Old content is worth sharing. Oh well.

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Employer Branding 3.0?

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Gotcha. If you were expecting another one of those navel-gazing, future-predicting blog posts, you’d better quit reading now. This is a bemused blog. A wondering post. Even a ‘WTF is everyone going on about’ few hundred words. It’s all the fault of just two: ‘Employer Branding’.

Recently, the recruitment world appears awash with conferences, talks, summits and blogs about this ‘mythical’ subject. The rise of social media for recruiting (aka social recruiting) has sparked a huge interest in those two words. How it’s vital in this social world. That companies are finally tying it and engagement together. How it is front and centre in this digital age.

May we just hold it there for a second. But wasn’t it always this way. Companies have always sort to attract the right candidates. The best employees have always been best ambassadors for you as an employer. Your culture has been the guiding light. The best companies have always been honest. Open. And appealing. The truth about them revealed. Your ‘recruitment marketing’ had the power to deselect, as much as attract, candidates. Word of mouth was spread – good and bad – even before the birth of a Tweet or a Facebook Like. So what is the difference now?

Just because all the buzz is around social media content, mobile engagement et al, doesn’t make it that different to the posters, advertising, direct marketing, brochures and websites of old. Times have changed, media has altered, technology is more advanced but the basics are unaltered – if you were approaching it in the right way in the first place.

So, this ‘now’ Holy Grail of the Employer Brand that is being toted around is nothing new. Nothing fantastical. Nothing magical. It has always been key. (Or should have been.) It shouldn’t take a new vehicle of recruitment to make you think about it. The rise of social media might have emphasised its role but don’t be fooled into believing it’s never been important before. It always was, always will be.

Sometimes the small things are the most rewarding

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It’s not always big budgets that turn a creative on. Nor the chance of your big idea becoming a multichannel, multimedia campaign. Not even the thought that ‘this is an award winner’ (if only it was that easy to recognise that one). No, quite often it’s just a ‘neat’ little concept that feels so right. This was one of those.

It began with our opportunity to re-brand the Central London Retail Personnel Group – a retail and hospitality networking group, formed in 1991 by HR professionals from companies including John Lewis, House of Fraser, Russell & Bromley and Marks & Spencer. We re-named: The Retail HR Circle London. Gave it a contemporary identity. Created and built a new website including a members-only social community area. And this business ‘bag’.

It’s such a simple idea. A gusseted card. Reflecting exactly what the organisation is about. It’s a ‘shopping’ bag. And most importantly, it has personality – standing proud from the sea of ubiquitous square cut corporate flatness.

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