Can’t the recruitement industry spel anymore?

 photo Recruitementheadline_zps53caee79.png

Or do people just not care? Every day, without any exaggeration, you see a totally inept mistake. From Eshots. Blogs. Social Media. Infographics. Even client work on agency websites. There’s a typo (or even two). An improper punctuation here and there. They’re on communications. Selling your business. Or on behalf of your clients. Recently they’ve become more apparent. Now I’m not some grammar geek on the hunt to catch anyone out but when you see this almost daily it’s difficult not to notice them. Or maybe that’s just me and my years in advertising, being taught and then practising the art of craft and importance of detail. But there seems to be a growing sloppiness.

The cause? Laziness? Poor education? Time pressures? Lack of attention? It’s as easy to get it right, as it is to do it incorrectly. Back in the day, this would all have been inexcusable. If pointed out, shame would follow. Apologies made. In this social age, where misspelt tweets are one thing – thank god, for the scapegoat of predictive text – it seems it’s ignored, forgiven, accepted.

As the majority of recent offenders are companies, organisations and agencies involved in the world of recruitment, do they care so little about their reputation? Do their clients or customers care even less? It seems as we get more technologically advanced, we are forgetting all the old skills we used to practise. Poofreading for one. Not relying on spellcheck for two. Having some pride in what you do, three. And four, holding your hands up if you’ve made an honest mistake that someone spots. Interestingly, of a few recent sightings where we’ve ponted out a spelling fail only one company was open enough to acknowledge it. Kudos to them. As to the rest… think they’ll even spot the two deliberate spelling mistakes in this blog (and they’re not the ones in the title)?

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1 Comment »

  1. Totally agree – maybe I am too old school, but I often feel that the whole message that they are trying to convey is diluted by lack of care and attention


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